Results for category "rehab stories"

2 Articles

C14, Indiana’s oldest Bald Eagle

Where were you in July of 1987?

C14,  Indiana's oldest Bald Eagle, held by a staff member at Indiana Raptor Center.

C14, Indiana’s oldest Bald Eagle in the care of Indiana Raptor Center.

This bald eagle was being hacked, or prepared for release to the wild, in an area near Lake Monroe, Indiana. Bands have identified this eagle as C14, the oldest eagle ever recorded in Indiana at the ripe old age of 28 years, 9 months! He was banded as a youngster on July 13, 1987, during the third year of eagle reintroduction efforts by the Indiana DNR.

C14 was admitted to Indiana Raptor Center on Friday, April 15 after being found at the confluence of the Eel and White River grounded by a severe shoulder dislocate and resulting emaciation. Since then, he has been gaining weight. We began treatment with tube feedings, pain medications, and anti-inflammatories. We put his wing in a harness-type sling to stabilize his dislocated shoulder. We also took care to clean and top dress a few facial lacerations, as they were close to the sinus area. After a week, C14 progressed from tube feedings to whole food with little feather or fur, and we continue to monitor him closely. It is likely that C14 will not be able to be released to the wild, but as long as he is able to eat and not in pain, he will live out his days in human care.

We salute this eagle for courage and intelligence to have survived so long in the wild. To think of the young he has raised, the weather he has endured, challenges from other eagles and human encroachment: it is truly a miracle!

Stay tuned at our Facebook page and as ever, your help is appreciated! Your donation will go directly to caring for C14 and birds like him. Learn more about C14 from the Indiana DNR.

C14,  Indiana's oldest Bald Eagle , eats a solid meal.

C14, Indiana’s oldest Bald Eagle , eats a solid meal.

Vulture Awareness Day!

Today is Vulture Awareness Day around the world. Vultures may not be the most popular birds among the general public, but they are vital members of the environment. They are facing a range of pressures around the world, most famously from diclofenac poisoning.

Official International Vulture Awareness Day logo

The official International Vulture Awareness Day logo

A few years ago, I accompanied Patti Reynolds and stalwart volunteer/ house taxidermist Markus to retrieve and injured Turkey Vulture. Her wing injury would prove to be of the sort that just can’t be fixed, but Markus, Patti, and Laura gave the bird their all in hopes of a good outcome. It is so often the case that the stresses these birds encounter before entering Indiana Raptor Center’s care prove to be too much, and the best that can be done is to provide a safe, stress-free environment for their passing.

Patti and Markus rescue an injured Turkey Vulture

Patti and Markus rescue an injured Turkey Vulture

An injured Turkey Vulture, rescued by Indiana Raptor Center

An injured Turkey Vulture, rescued by Indiana Raptor Center

Laura Edmunds and Patti Reynolds tend to an injured Turkey Vulture

Laura Edmunds and Patti Reynolds tend to an injured Turkey Vulture

It was exciting to watch my first bird rescue. For my part, I got to hold a big net and help form a perimeter so Patti and Markus could nab her. She had not eaten recently, and therefore couldn’t manage the trademarked defense-by-repulsion method Turkey Vultures favor: good old-fashioned puke.

Bird rescue and rehabilitation is a tireless occupation, with many heartbreaks along the way. Please donate to Indiana Raptor Center to help us rescue and care for these birds, and if you cannot attend our Raptor Rendezvous fundraiser on September 12, 2015, please consider purchasing a ticket for a local first responder!

Paypal donation button